EATING THROUGH CONCRETE

Termite infestation is perhaps a homeowner’s worst nightmare. And with that comes endless consultations, discussions, and perhaps, even some village gossip:

 

Do termites really eat through concrete?

 

That has been a long speculation as mud tunnels can be frequently seen even on concrete walls too. It perhaps created a scare that nothing is ever safe from termites anymore. From wood, drywall, foams, plastics and now even concrete? It’s a fear of a lifetime.

 

But due to the persistence of this termite discussion, professionals finally weigh on the issue. And their answers are all the same.

 

Termites do not eat through concrete.

Cracked concrete makes way for termite to enter

Concrete is not food for termites and therefore not beneficial to them. Instead, what they do is crawl in the cracks and crevices found on concreate walls to make their way to their food (timbers, furniture, wood panels, etc.) all inside the house. The cement texture is also too rough that making mud tunnels is necessary to protect their soft bodies. While these mud tunnels in and on concrete walls are definitely a sign of termite infestation, it does not mean that termites gnaw their way through it at all.

Termites cannot gnaw on concrete. They prefer papers, timbers, and natural wood.

Termites supposedly “eating through walls” have just cleverly made use of already existing gaps and holes from plumbing, wiring, or any other utility construction. When crevices are left unsealed, these gaps are the sure way for pests—not only termites—to be able to enter your house.

 

To ensure that no termites will be able to go through your concrete wall, have a regular inspection for cracks or gaps especially in the foundations of your house. Even as small as 1.4mm is big enough for termites to crawl in. Other signs you have to look out for are paper-like wood texture, discarded wings, or even dead termites scattered around.